Wednesday Breakout Sessions

October 13, 2021 — Session Times and Descriptions

[CC = Ohio Public Library Core Competency]

Session Times and Descriptions:


Wednesday, October 13, 2021
1:45 -2:45 p.m.

(CHOOSE ONE)

Up Close with Jason Reynolds
Time: 1:45-2:45 p.m.
Room: Fairfield
Track: Author Spotlight
CC: RAD
Presenter: Jason Reynolds

Hear more from our Convention keynote Jason Reynolds during this session.

How Stress and Trauma Impact our Brain
Time: 1:45-2:45 p.m.
Room: Knox
Track: Patron Awareness
CC: ENG
Presenter: Jeremy Joseph, Montgomery County ESC

Building resiliency and managing stress are keys to creating safe, supportive learning environments for the community. Learn how stress, trauma, and adverse experiences impact learning/teaching, emotional regulation, and behavior.

Creating a Safe, Supportive Environment for Trans & Nonbinary Staff & Patrons
Time: 1:45-2:45 p.m.
Room: Morrow
Track: Equity, Diversity and Inclusion
CC: INF
Presenters: Jen Farrell, Huron Community Library; Alison Kennedy, Ohio History Connection; and Becky Woodruff

In this information-packed session, learn some LGBTQ+ basics, the importance of personal pronouns, best practices for respecting someone’s pronouns, and how to examine library policies and practices with an LGBTQ+-informed eye. Creating a safe, inclusive environment for patrons begins with creating a safe, inclusive environment for staff. Come away with some ideas that will help you ensure that your library is truly open to all.

Romancing the Reader: From Ripping Bodices to Respecting Boundaries
Time: 1:45-2:45 p.m.
Room: Madison
Track: Readers’ Advisory/Collections
CC: RAD
Presenter: Kristina Richey, Dayton Metro Library

Romance is one of the most popular genres today. According to Publishers Weekly, among genre fiction romance is second only to suspense in sales and a Statista survey found that 42% of readers said they read romance novels on a regular basis. While popular, the genre is often derided for its bodice ripping reputation. However, the romance genre has changed drastically in the past few years, branching out to include a much more inclusive variety of characters, experiences, and perspectives. For those familiar and unfamiliar, this session will function as a feminist primer for the romance genre, highlighting stories that examine power dynamics, consent, sexuality, identity, and so much more.

Planning a Next Generation Library Renovation with One Foot in and One Foot Beyond a Pandemic
Time: 1:45-2:45 p.m.
Room: Franklin C
Track: Management
CC: ACQ
Presenters: Brett Bonfield, Cincinnati & Hamilton County Public Library (CHPL); Amanda Markovic, GBBN

Through the pandemic, we all have had to adapt to continue providing resources to our communities, but most have been short-term responses (stop gaps for the current crisis). This raises the question of the long-term consequences of the pandemic for library design. Back in March 2020—while preparing to shift to remote services—CHPL was also receiving proposals for the renovation of a 25,000 SF, former TJ Maxx to become our first Next Generation Library in Deer Park. As the design process began, we asked how the library’s design will respond to the pandemic. But instead of thinking about how this new library should respond to the current crisis, we really needed to strategically plan how the spaces we create are adaptable enough to respond to the needs of the community as they change over time. This could involve abrupt, short-term needs like COVID-imposed social distancing requirements. But they could also involve creating spaces that meet the unique needs of the community as they evolve more or less quickly: for instance, by providing spaces flexible enough to support senior social hours in the morning, afterschool snacks in the afternoon, and ESL classes that serve newly arrived community members in the evening.

The Benefits of Board Games
Time: 1:45-2:45 p.m.
Room: Franklin D
Track: Programming
CC: CLM
Presenter: Kellen Freeman, Delaware County District Library

Analog gaming — card, board, and role playing games — have made a significant come back over the last decade. Over that time, more libraries have been embracing digital gaming for their collections and programming. But more are starting to expand their focus into analog gaming as well. Kellen Freeman has run the Delaware County District Library’s board game and RPG collection for over five years. This session will explore the rise of analog gaming, introduce you to some of the most unique and best games available, and teach you how to add this style of collection to your own libraries.

Cancelled  Why Aren’t They Using the Library? Overcoming Barriers to Library Use
Time: 1:45-2:45 p.m.
Room: Franklin B
Track: Leading Libraries
CC: EDI
Presenter: Jessica Curtis, Westerville Public Library

Do you have amazing products, classes, and services … but no one’s using them? There may be several, very good reasons that you have the chance to influence. This session will cover common reasons why patrons, or entire user groups, are not coming to the library or using library resources. These will include library policy considerations, customer service, local demographics and cultural considerations, and active and passive marketing in the library and in the community.

Media Training 101: Lights, Camera, Action!
Time: 1:45-2:45 p.m.
Room: Franklin A
Track: Our Communities
CC: COM
Presenters: Gregg Dodd and Ben Zenitsky, Columbus Metropolitan Library

Engaging your local media is an important marketing channel that can amplify your library’s story. Columbus Metropolitan Library (CML) has implemented an aggressive earned media strategy that has resulted in a substantial increase in print, radio and television news coverage for the library. As part of that strategy, CML’s Marketing Department implemented media training to ensure brand messages are delivered with clarity, credibility and authority. CML’s marketing team will share strategies on building your own training tracks and provide you with the tools and perspective needed to improve your library’s ability to engage with members of the media.


Wednesday, October 13, 2021
4:15 -5:15 p.m.

(CHOOSE ONE)

Hanif Abdurraqib: Poetry, Music Criticism, and French Fries
Time: 4:15 -5:15 p.m.
Room: Fairfield
Track: Author Spotlight
CC: RAD
Presenter: Hanif Abdurraqib

Join this award-winning poet, essayist, and cultural critic from Columbus, Ohio as he reads from his work and discusses the inspiration and stories behind his prolific writing. Hanif Abdurraqib’s poetry collections include The Crown Ain’t Worth Much and A Fortune for Your Disaster. He is also the author of They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us, the New York bestseller Go Ahead in the Rain: Notes to a Tribe Called Quest, and the forthcoming A Little Devil in America. His poetry has been published in Muzzle, Vinyl, PEN American, and various other journals and his essays and music criticism have been published in The FADER, Pitchfork, The New Yorker, and The New York Times.

How They See Us: Research on What Public Library Patrons Value about the Library
Time: 4:15 -5:15 p.m.
Room: Knox
Track: Patron Awareness
CC: STP
Presenters: Kara Reuter and Lisa Fuller, Worthington Libraries

Public libraries have lofty goals to promote literacy and lifelong learning, to provide access to authoritative information and to foster civic engagement. At the same time, we’re eager to demonstrate we’re “more than just books,” by offering splashy new resources and services, from the library of things and the human library to voice assistants and passport processing. But do patrons actually look to the public library for these things? Worthington Libraries and OCLC partnered to survey nearly 1,300 people and conduct 30 in-depth interviews in order to learn about the activities people undertake at the library and elsewhere in the community as well as the factors that influence their library use. We will share our findings on how library patrons see us and how this sometimes conflicts with how we see ourselves. Use what you learn from our presentation to prioritize your own library’s offerings and plan for the future.

Understanding Deaf Language, Culture and Community
Time: 4:15 -5:15 p.m.
Room: Morrow
Track: Equity, Diversity and Inclusion
CC: PAW
Presenters: Dawn Watts and Marsha Moore, Ohio Citizens for Deaf Culture; Arlon Nash, Interpreters of the Deaf, LLC; Ben Gulyas, Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library

A panel of presenters will provide firsthand knowledge and strategies to help public library staff to provide deaf-friendly services and accessible spaces and programs. You’ll gain ideas on how to improve access and services for the Deaf community.

I Think My House is Haunted: Historic Property Research Basics for Library Staff
Time: 4:15 -5:15 p.m.
Room: Madison
Track: Readers’ Advisory/Collections
CC: REF
Presenter: William Stoltz, Dayton Metro Library

Does your community have a historic district and/or a large number of older houses? Is the library staff regularly asked about the history of local buildings? Public libraries are often the first stop for novice researchers seeking information on the history of their property. This session will provide the basic steps of house research and share a variety of local, state, and national resources available in print as well as online. In addition, Bill Stolz will discuss how to locate and use property records, government records, maps, library resources, and other research tools that can be used by library staff to assist patrons in solving those historical home mysteries.

OPLIN Update
Time: 4:15 -5:15 p.m.
Room: Marion
Track: Management
CC: TIS
Presenter: Don Yarman, Executive Director, OPLIN

Get the latest information from the Ohio Public Library Information Network (OPLIN) during this annual update to the public library community. Everyone is invited to attend.

Here There Be Dragons: Gamify Your Reading Program
Time: 4:15 -5:15 p.m.
Room: Franklin D
Track: Programming
CC: PRG
Presenters: Mallory Thompson and Liz Strauss, Dover Public Library

Mallory Thompson and Liz Strauss of the Dover Public Library will talk about their reading program inspired by virtual pets and collectible card games. In this reading incentive program, young participants collect and grow their own collection of dragon cards by reading and visiting the library. Learn how Reading Dragons was developed and how you can adapt the idea to enhance your library’s reading program. You will receive access to free printable materials, including all Reading Dragons cards designed by Dover Public Library staff as well as image files to use in coloring your own dragon cards.

Reaching Marginalized Teens Through Novels in Verse
Time: 4:15 -5:15 p.m.
Room: Franklin C
Track: Youth Services
CC: EDI
Presenter: Lisa Krok, Morley Library

Novels in verse are a terrific resource for teachers and librarians as a way of reaching all teens, especially marginalized teens and those who may be struggling or reluctant readers. They also provide a more modern, practical alternative to the classic canon, which may not appeal to many teens or may intimidate them by the sheer number of words per page. Participants will discover ways to pair verse novels with teens based upon their needs, interests, and specific situations, discuss advocacy strategies for rethinking the canon, and gather ideas for engaging poetry activities related to the novels in verse.

Beyond 2021: What Comes Next for Small Libraries
Time: 4:15 -5:15 p.m.
Room: Franklin B
Track: Leading Libraries
CC: ADP
Presenters: Daphne Silchuk-Ashcraft, Orrville Public Library; Kathy Zappitello, Conneaut Public Library; and Brenda Miller, New Madison Public Library

This session will discuss lessons learned during the pandemic and transformations that are here to stay. Learn more about adaptive services to reach community members where they are comfortable as well as creative ideas to get library patrons back in the building!

Opening the Book on School and Library Partnerships: Establishing Connections with Middle and High Schools
Time: 4:15 -5:15 p.m.
Room: Franklin A
Track: Our Communities
CC: PAR
Presenter: Bridget Sutter, Medina County District Library

Trying to establish a relationship with a high school or middle school to promote library services to teens can be a frustrating experience. Teachers are busy and it can be difficult for them to sacrifice class time to an outside presenter. But with flexibility and patience, Medina County District Library created thriving partnerships with area schools. In this session, you’ll learn about the library’s quarterly book talk visits to freshman classes, how we helped teachers obtain teen library cards for their students, how we conduct juvenile detention center visits and how the library promotes the Summer Reading Program. You’ll also learn some of our missteps and how you can avoid them. By the end of this presentation, you’ll have tried and true ideas that you can implement at your library, regardless of size.